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Special Device Help Prevent Suddent Infant Death

Special Device Help Prevent Suddent Infant Death

Researchers from Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM in Berlin has developed a new breathing sensor system that help prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). This syst...

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University Installs Grass Lawn in School Library

University Installs Grass Lawn in School Library

Cornell University has built a grass lawn inside their school library as a part of a project of their institution's Department of Design and Environmental Analysis. The department is currently conducting a r...

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Wash Your Clothes in a Portable Washing Machine [Video]

Wash Your Clothes in a Portable Washing Machine [Video]

Meet, the Scrubba, a portable washing machine, in form of a bag. This wash bag, allows people to do their laundry, on-the-go. The Scrubba is a lightweight, foldable bag that features small nodules to help sc...

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Fart-Deodorizing Underwear Sold in Japan

Fart-Deodorizing Underwear Sold in Japan

Thanks to Japan's new invention, the Deoest underwear, extreme farters can now release their foul smelling gas and prevent people near them from fainting. It is a fart-deodorizing underwear, created by Profe...

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Work Slower with Sims 2, Faster with Call of Duty 2

Written on September 15, 2010 by Rudfer Tyron

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Are non-computer-related decisions dependent on your video-game-playing habits?

The University of Rochester conducted a study involving a crowd of 18- to 25-year-old males and females who were not avid video gamers. Half of them were given 50 hours to play Call of Duty 2 and Unreal Tournament, while the other half were given Sims 2.

And then they had them work largely on computer-based tasks. The result? Players of the action games performed 25% faster, and just as accurate, as those who played Sims 2.

This was not the first study to emphasize the application of video-game playing to real-life situations. Surgeons performing lacroscopic surgery have been noted to improve on their operations after playing. Some practical stuff would otherwise make us think though. Does firing up an Xbox actually help a mother decide what food she will serve her family for dinner? The study did not have comparative data to begin with–the decision-making skill and speed of the participants prior to the test. What is your opinion on this, folks?

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