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Special Device Help Prevent Suddent Infant Death

Special Device Help Prevent Suddent Infant Death

Researchers from Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM in Berlin has developed a new breathing sensor system that help prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). This syst...

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University Installs Grass Lawn in School Library

University Installs Grass Lawn in School Library

Cornell University has built a grass lawn inside their school library as a part of a project of their institution's Department of Design and Environmental Analysis. The department is currently conducting a r...

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Wash Your Clothes in a Portable Washing Machine [Video]

Wash Your Clothes in a Portable Washing Machine [Video]

Meet, the Scrubba, a portable washing machine, in form of a bag. This wash bag, allows people to do their laundry, on-the-go. The Scrubba is a lightweight, foldable bag that features small nodules to help sc...

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Fart-Deodorizing Underwear Sold in Japan

Fart-Deodorizing Underwear Sold in Japan

Thanks to Japan's new invention, the Deoest underwear, extreme farters can now release their foul smelling gas and prevent people near them from fainting. It is a fart-deodorizing underwear, created by Profe...

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Economic Data Still Unsatisfactory, Fed Official Said

Written on June 07, 2011 by Lulu

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Recent economic data and reports are still disappointing and could interrupt the Fed's move out from its easy financial policy .

The president of Boston Federal Reserve Bank, Eric Rosengren, told CNBC in an interview that the slowdown does change when the appropriate exit strategy has come. He said that it was too untimely to deliberate whether the Fed should set out on a third round of quantitative easing, but did not rule out. As well as cutting down the rates to near zero in December 2008, the Fed has more than tripled its balance sheet to around $2.7 trillion. Its $600 billion second round of quantitative easing also known as QE2, conclude this month.

Philadelphia Fed President, Charles Plosser, and Dallas Fed President, Richard Fisher, expressed strong opposition to doing more. They voted on the policy this year, while Eric Rosengren did not. Richard Fisher said in a Market News International Conference in New York that the Fed has done sufficiently enough, if not too much, to aid the economy. He also said that he personally do not foresee additional accommodation. Richard Fisher anticipates economic growth to accelerate in the second half of this year. He also expects inflation to be tempered as the temporary boost from rising energy and commodity prices deteriorate.

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US Stocks Hypes Up due to Afternoon Boost

Written on March 24, 2011 by Japhet Writ

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U.S. stocks finished higher Wednesday. Thanks to a late-day advance, as investors shrugged off jitters about turmoil in the Middle East and Japan's nuclear issues.

With investors shrugging off jitters about the Middle East turmoil and nuclear issues in Japan, the US stocks finished higher last Wednesday due to a late-afternoon boost. Dow Jones closed 67 points higher, while S&P and Nasdaq gained 4 and 14 points respectively. On other hand, the Bank of America is the worst performer on the blue-chip index. According to them, they need to revise their dividend plan after the Fed rejected their initial proposal.

Traders spent most of Wednesday – and the sessions before that – on the sidelines, as global concerns linger. But with lack of any significant developments, they tip-toe their way back into the market later in the afternoon. According to KDV Wealth Management Vice President, Paul Radeke:

“We’ve been watching for more news out of Japan and the Middle East, but there’s not much new information, so that’s improving some confidence. There’s a lot of pent-up demand, and a lack of further bad news will lift the market.”

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Japan Stocks Surges After G7 Pledge

Written on March 18, 2011 by Japhet Writ

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Despite Japan being hit by an 8.9 magnitude earthquake followed by a Tsunami, its economy continues to surge. Is this a good sign?

Disaster-stricken Japan opened higher last Friday after G7 finance ministries pledged a coordinated intervention to prevent the currency market from rising higher.

The Nikkei 225 gained 260 points, shortly after the market opened, while Hang Seng climbed to 0.5% and Shanghai Composite remains flat. Authorities from US, UK, Canada, and European Central Bank stated that they will join Japan in a “concerted intervention in exchange markets”. Considered as a safe haven for global investors, Yen has been driven higher these past few days by speculation.

A continuous cash flow in Japan can make the Yen stronger, posing a threat to the country’s export-driven economy. The Japanese market has also been roiled with uncertainty, as investors attempt to comprehend the implications of Fukushina Daiichi’s crippled nuclear power plant.

With Japan’s uncertain ebb and tide of stocks, will this give good implications in the country’s economy?

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Japanese Economy Plunges After the Earthquake

Written on March 14, 2011 by Japhet Writ

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After an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan last Friday, the country's economy is now on a fragile state.

The Japanese stock market went to a drop last Monday, after an 8.8 magnitude earthquake and Tsunami hit the country on Friday. Due to economic impact of last week’s disaster, benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average fell to 9,666.64 points.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. is expected to drop double digits with its malfunctioning nuclear reactors and power shortage. Investors also dumped shares over concerns about economic production and consumption, making export stocks register a staggering loss. In addition to this, automobile manufacturers like Toyota Motor Corp., Nissan Motor Co., and Honda Motor Co. suspended production at all auto plants in Japan. Insurance companies, including Tokio Marine Holdings Inc., also acquired sharp drops by 16 percent. Japan’s biggest clothing store, Fast Retailing Co., lost 4.7 percent, while Cosmo Oil plummeted to 25.6 percent.

On a positive note, industrial and material companies like Kojima Corp. rose on expectations to benefit from the country’s rebuilding efforts. The Bank of Japan put in seven billion yen into money markets, defending the already frail economy. That way, the central bank hopes that other financial institutions will continue lending money to meet the anticipated demands for post-earthquake funds.

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China Lands No. 2 in World Economy

Written on February 14, 2011 by Japhet Writ

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Move over Japan! China is now the second largest economy in the world.

Last Monday, China took the no. 2 spot in the world’s largest economy as the country released a GDP figure of $5.88 trillion for 2010. This makes Japan drop to no. 3 at $5.47 trillion — thanks to China’s speed in manufacturing growth.

This manufacturing growth is due to China’s expanded domestic industries and infrastructure, driven by a surge in exports. In addition to this, multinational corporation also took advantage of the low labor cost by expanding their business in the country. With continuous and steady growth, the Japanese government predicts that China will outdone US as the world’s largest economy in less than 20 years.

Does this mean that the land of the Sleeping Dragon is finally awaken?

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“Winner Takes All” Economy for U.S.

Written on October 03, 2010 by R. Depp

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The U.S. economy suffers more; income inequality between the rich and the poor rises even more.

Recent study shows that the gap between the richest and poorest American grew in the past twelve months. It is the young adults and the children who struggled most in these situations.

In the latest census figures, the American top-earners received 4.9 percent of the income generated in the U.S. while the workers below the property line earn only a staggering 3.4 percent.

The Census Bureau used a tool which is called the intertional Gini index to measure the inequality. And the bureau found out it is at its highest level since 1967. The U.S. also has the greatest income inequality among Western nations.

A different measure, the international Gini index, found U.S. income inequality at its highest level since the Census Bureau began tracking household income in 1967. The U.S. also has the greatest disparity among Western industrialized nations.

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